Affordable Housing Found in Downtown Brooklyn

210 Livingston Street
210 Livingston Street, an affordable housing/market rate project, should have views of 141 Livingston Street, otherwise known as Brooklyn Housing Court.

Yes, dreams do come true in Brooklyn, and so does affordable housing. The proof is in the pudding, located just outside the A/C/G Hoyt Schermerhorn stop. Out of a total of 375 total units, the 25 story project will contain 74 “affordable” units. The remainder are expected to be residential condos. As an interesting twist, the regulatory agreement filed in ACRIS states the owner receives a LIHTC (Low Income Housing Tax Credit) and a 421-a tax benefit. The same units can be applied to both tax programs to meet eligibitily requirements. This practice has been criticized as double dipping taxpayer dollars.

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845 Broadway Shows Signs of Life, Sort of

839 Broadway
Corner of Park Street and Broadway. Look at that stonework.

845 Broadway is a property in southwest Bushwick, just east of Flushing Avenue, that has seen better days. The roof looks like Swiss cheese, the windows are boarded up, and the facade is wrapped in metal. But there’s something architecturally remarkable that still lurks behind all the years of neglect. The old pre-war facade still remains in salvageable condition. Just a bit of TLC could get this property looking like new, or at least something close to it.

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Has 325 Kent Avenue Solved the PTAC Crisis?

Hidden PTACs.
325 Kent Avenue
That thing is operational.
There are PTACs hidden in there.

PTAC, or Packaged Terminal Air Conditioners, have become a scourge among those with an eye for architecture. As New York continues to build unabated, our skyline, and PTACs, have experienced uninhibited growth.

PTACs are an inexpensive way to heat and cool a room, or multiple rooms as the case may be. They avoid the cost of central air and heat, which can be extraordinary. Just think of all the duct work, lost interior space, massive heating and cooling units, and maintenance required to heat and cool a large highrise. PTACs slice those costs into smithereens. PTACs cost less than $1,000 per unit, and more often in the range of $300-$600 per unit. Also, if one unit breaks, the loss doesn’t take the entire building offline. Further, such units are often found in affordable buildings, but they have crept their way into luxury buildings as well.

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